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Children born to women on HIV therapy more likely to have microcephaly, developmental delays

Children born to women on HIV therapy more likely to have microcephaly, developmental delays

According to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health, women with antiretroviral drug use, compared with those with microcephaly or small head, who are on drug therapy, are on HIV therapy. Children born to women were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to be microcephaly or small in size. Children with health microcephaly also have a higher risk of developmental delay, compared to children with normal head size.

This study was conducted by Harvard T. K. Page D. Williams, Ph.D. Chen School of Public Health, and partner. It appears in the Lancet.

Our findings highlight the importance of combining therapy with opiates for HIV-positive pregnant women. "

Rohan Hazara, MD, study author and chief of the NIH's Younus Kennedy Schriver National Institute of Children's Health and Human Development, Infectious Disease Branch for Children and Children, who provided funding for this study.

Researchers analyzed research data on more than 3,000 infants born to women on HIV therapy during pregnancy. In this preliminary study, the circumference of children's head was periodically measured from 6 months of age to 5 years of age.

For the present study, investigators used a two-rating system to rate children's head growth. The first classification system developed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for children under the age of 3 years, which is designed for children under 3 years of age There is an old set of standards. For the second rating system, researchers consulted the Nile House charts from birth to 18 years of age.

Based on the bluehouse criteria, children whose mothers were on drug affinities were more than twice as likely to be microcephaly than children whose mothers were on other regimens. According to the Nile House-CDC Common Standards, children with cervical afferents in the uterus were approximately 2.5 times more likely to have a microcephaly. According to the microcephaly bluehas standards, children also scored less in standard developmental tests of children between the ages of 1 and 5 years.

Of the 141 children with cervical cancer, 14 (9.9%) were microcephaly, while 142 out of 2,842 who were not exposed to afferents (5%).

Researchers say dealing with all other forms of HIV treatment is not associated with a higher risk of microcephaly.

Source:
NIH / Younes Kennedy Shaver National Institute of Children's Health and Human Development

Journal Reference:
Williams, P.L., et al. (2019) Association of maternal antiretroviral use with microcephaly in HIV-infected but infected (smart) children: a prospective cohort study. Lancet HIV doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3018(19)30340-6.